Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Unrelated Blogger Comments August 2017


20 comments:

  1. August doesn't look anything like that where I am ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Octopuses don't have myelin in their brains. And most of the octopus brain is not in it's head and more than half it's neurons are distributed though out it arms. I wonder if this can tell us something about MS, like what I am not sure yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be better to be an octopus. Also because a lot of arms would be great for getting keys out to unlock the front door whilst carrying shopping, hanging up laundry faster, and stirring a pot on the cooker whilst turning the pages of a good novel.

      Delete
    2. And octopuses don't get MS I guess. They are very intelligent and can open jars of food.

      Delete
    3. Nevermind...octopuses is the correct pluralization. My mistake.

      Delete
  3. When a new drug is approved currently, does it have to list its NEDA-4 so that we may compare it to the best drugs available on the market? This would compare apples to apples using a common language. Does governing bodies put most of its weight on approval of a new drug based on its NEDA-4?

    ReplyDelete
  4. What about desensibilisation strategies for myolin. I see severale phase 2 studies. Than nothing more. What's the reason?

    ReplyDelete
  5. We would have a cure for MS if all the money drug companies brought in from MS drugs was put back into MS research.

    We would have a cure if even 10% of that money was.

    It is a tragedy and failure beyond words that MS it not cured yet.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have read all the posts about neuropathic pain on this blog. I'm interested in research on the relationship between increased severity of pain and the disease process, particularly for progressive ms with no active lesions, but many in the spinal cord. In general, I can't find anything about clinical symptoms and the disease process other than using, say, the 25 foot time walking test. (Not really a question, just commenting.)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Could exenatide help MS ? and is it being tested for MS? It's in the news today about it helping halt Parkinsons.

    The BBC website today discusses exenatide for Parkingson and mentions " It is why the drug is being tested in other neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. "

    ReplyDelete
  8. Dosing with supplements- how safe and reliable a step to take???
    Deglycyrrhised licorice root extract + ginger root + alpha lipoic acid + fish oil + lions mane. This isn't a complete list of the pills I'm popping as there are those I was previously taking, before diagnosis, such as probiotics. Now my body is swimming with the effects of having received Alemtuzumab. I'm taking the atttitude 'every little helps', combined with a cautionary approach evidenced by giving myself breaks from taking say lions mane or taking a reduced dosage of licorice. I'm right though aren't I in thinking there's no way of knowing the risks to benefits. I felt well informed in choosing to have Alemtuzumab, but far, far less secure in my choices post infusion. 'Hoping for the best!' Anticipate there are other PwMS with their fingers crossed each time they swallow another supplement capsule!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I would love to live in the remote village to enjoy an organic life, given the resources and discipline.

    Regards,
    Susan Baker

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thought you would find interesting MD:

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-08-closer-multiple-sclerosis-relapse-upper.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Does the same mechanism of activation of glial cells happen when pwMS is vaccinated against influenza, for example?
      I know several people who say they have relapsed from MS after taking the flu vaccine.

      Delete
  11. Is eclipse viewing ok with optic neuritis?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ensure you where the eclipse glasses as many people will be blinded by looking at the sun

      Delete
  12. Will pwMS that do HSTC and have relapses have a relapse because they would have some type of deficiency in the production of GH (growth hormone), either in the endocrine (in the pituitary gland) production or in the local production of GH in the immune cells?

    And GH has a connection with Vitamin D, because it seems that those who have Vitamin D deficiency may also have GH.

    If so who has Acromegaly would be free of MS?

    I didn't know this until I talked to an endocrinologist doctor, what is my friend, who said that in some children treated with GH for dwarfism they had suppression of the immune system, mainly of the B cells.

    ReplyDelete

Please note that all comments are moderated and any personal or marketing-related submissions will not be shown.